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Sunday, July 26, 2020 | History

4 edition of Frame-of-reference bias in subjective welfare regressions found in the catalog.

Frame-of-reference bias in subjective welfare regressions

Kathleen Beegle

Frame-of-reference bias in subjective welfare regressions

by Kathleen Beegle

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  • 16 Currently reading

Published by World Bank in [Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Economics -- Tajikistan

  • Edition Notes

    StatementKathleen Beegle, Kristen Himelein, Martin Ravallion.
    SeriesPolicy research working paper -- 4904, Policy research working papers (Online) -- 4904.
    ContributionsHimelein, Kristen., Ravallion, Martin., World Bank.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsHG3881.5.W57
    The Physical Object
    FormatElectronic resource
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL23226618M
    LC Control Number2009655532

    Book/Printed Material Frame-of-reference bias in subjective welfare regressions "Past research has found that subjective questions about an individuals' economic status do not correspond closely to measures of economic welfare based on household income or consumption. OCLC Number: Notes: Includes bibliographical references. - Title from PDF file as viewed on 5/7/ Description: 1 Online-Ressource. Series Title.

    (by Kathleen Beegle, Kristen Himelein, and Martin Ravallion; see Frame of Reference Bias in Subjective Welfare Regressions) Subjective Economic Welfare Printer-friendly version. Abstract. We studied whether relative income has an impact on subjective well-being among extremely poor people. Contrary to the findings in developed countries, where relative income has shown a significant and negative impact on subjective well-being, we cannot reject the hypothesis that relative income has no impact on subjective well-being in rural areas of northern Ethiopia.

    (). Frame-of-reference bias in subjective welfare regressions”. World Bank Policy Research Working Paper (). Happiness and growth the world over: Time series evidence on the happiness-income paradox”. (). Happiness and sociability, Kyklos v. ().   We argue that subjective welfare data offer a credible means of testing utility consistency across different needs groups. A case study of Russia's official poverty lines shows how revealed preference tests can be used in conjunction with qualitative information on needs heterogeneity. Frame-of-Reference Bias in Subjective Welfare.


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Frame-of-reference bias in subjective welfare regressions by Kathleen Beegle Download PDF EPUB FB2

Further, this heterogeneity may be correlated with other characteristics, including welfare, leading to frame-of-reference bias. To test for this bias, vignettes were added to a nationally representative survey of Tajikistan, in which survey respondents rank the economic status of the theoretical vignette households, as well as their own.

Past research has found that subjective questions about an individuals'economic status do not correspond closely to measures of economic welfare based on household income or consumption. Survey respondents undoubtedly hold diverse ideas about.

This paper explores the role of the frame-of-reference effect in influencing self-reported economic status and offers various tests for FORB, to see whether the standard regressions for subjective welfare found in the literature are contaminated by this effect and to assess the consequences of corrections for this bias to the types of results Cited by: Frame-of-reference bias in subjective welfare regressions (English) Abstract.

Past research has found that subjective questions about an individuals' economic status do not correspond closely to measures of economic welfare based on household income or by: Frame-of-reference bias in subjective welfare regressions.

In the second and third tests, we explore the extent of bias due to the frame of reference effect by embedding vignette ra nkings by households into standa rd regressions for subjective welfare.

These results provide a firmer foundation for standard survey methods and regression specifications for subjective welfare data.

Keywords: Rural Poverty Reduction Kathleen and Himelein, Kristen and Ravallion, Martin, Frame-of-Reference Bias in Subjective Welfare Regressions (April 1, ).

World Bank Policy Research Working Paper Series. regression coefficient of subjective welfare on wealth. Indeed, all three responses to the subjective welfare question may well be “2”. This type of bias may also be present when using other concepts of well-being such as life satisfaction or happiness.

There are antecedents to the idea of frame-of-reference effects in the literature. It is a. The inferences drawn from the most widely used regression models of subjective welfare are subject to a “frame-of-reference bias,” stemming from non-ignorable heterogeneity in subjective scales, such as what it means to be “rich” or “poor.”Cited by: The findings indicate that, while respondents hold diverse scales in assessing their welfare, there is little bias in either the economic gradient of subjective welfare or most of other coefficients on covariates of interest.

The text of the working paper "Frame of Reference Bias in Subjective Welfare Regressions" is available for downloading. Frame-of-Reference Bias in Subjective Welfare Regressions. c b. Tweet Like Share # Shares: 0. Download. English PDF KB. Text file KB. Published. Journal 1 of 1.

Author(s) Beegle, Kathleen. Frame-of-Reference Bias in Subjective Welfare Regressions. The inferences drawn from the most widely used regression models of subjective welfare are subject to a “frame-of-reference bias,” stemming from non-ignorable heterogeneity in subjective.

Beegle, Kathleen & Himelein, Kristen & Ravallion, Martin, "Frame-of-reference bias in subjective welfare regressions," Policy Research Working Paper Series Mark McGovern said.

There is also interesting recent work on this issue in relation to SWB: Beegle, K., Himelein, K., Ravallion, M., Frame-of-reference bias in subjective welfare regressions. Downloadable (with restrictions).

The inferences drawn from the most widely used regression models of subjective welfare are subject to a “frame-of-reference bias,” stemming from non-ignorable heterogeneity in subjective scales, such as what it means to be “rich” or “poor.” To test for this bias, respondents in Tajikistan were asked to rank the economic status of theoretical.

Frame-of-reference bias in subjective welfare regressions. By Kathleen Beegle, Kristen Himelein and Martin Ravallion. Download PDF ( KB) Abstract. Past research has found that subjective questions about an individuals'economic status do not correspond closely to measures of economic welfare based on household income or consumption.

Get this from a library. Frame-of-reference bias in subjective welfare regressions. [Kathleen Beegle; Kristen Himelein; Martin Ravallion; World Bank.] -- "Past research has found that subjective questions about an individuals' economic status do not correspond closely to measures of economic welfare based on household income or consumption.

and Ravallion (BHR) () used vignettes to study frame-of-reference effects on subjective welfare and offered various tests for confounding effects of scale heterogeneity using data for Tajikistan. BHR found that, despite the existence of scale heterogeneity, subjective welfare regressions that ignored the problem still gave quite similar.

The challenges faced in calibrating poverty and welfare measures to objective data have long been recognized. survey design issues, measurement errors, frame-of-reference effects, and latent heterogeneity in personality traits and personal tradeoffs. Directions for future research are identified.

Frame-of-Reference Bias in Subjective. The recent literature has shown that subjective welfare depends on relative income. Attempts to test this relationship in poor countries have yielded conflictin Keywords: Subjective well-being, relative deprivation, rivalry.

JEL Classification: I31, O Frame-of-Reference Bias in Subjective Welfare Regressions. Along with China becoming an upper-middle-income country from a lower-middle-income one afterthe happiness inequality in China has been enlarged. Based on the Chinese General Social Survey (CGSS) database (), this paper investigates the determinants of the happiness inequality in China and explores what factors contribute to its enlargement after Relative income may interact with individual characteristics, such as gender, to affect income satisfaction.

We also found that relative income treatment significantly increases income satisfaction inequality, primarily by causing social comparisons among different income groups, which has some welfare. The subjective welfare analysis can be used in poor developing countries for evaluating socioeconomic and distributional impacts of various policy interventions.

This paper - a product of the Poverty Team, Development Research Group - is part of a larger effort in the group to understand the relationship between subjective and objective.